koryos:

tailovecna:

dogitmayconcern:

dogofmylife:

koryos:

Canid Scent-Marking (or, Why Dogs Pee on Things)
I took a lot of pictures of dogs peeing on things for this article.
If you own a dog, have walked a dog, or just have seen a dog on TV, you have probably seen a dog peeing. Particularly that stereotyped male raised-leg posture that Luke is demonstrating above. (In this case, stereotyped refers to a fixed and repetitive set of movements, not a form of doggie-profiling.)
Dogs have a better sense of smell than we do. Heck, most mammals do; we just happen to be in a group- the simians- that ended up using vision a lot more than scent. At some point we more or less lost a means of communication that is absolutely fundamental to the lives of our hairy, warm-blooded cousins.
I’ve talked a bit before about how basic biological behaviors- such as sex or grooming or eating- can be co-opted by evolution to have a social meaning. For canids, urination has become a huge part of how they exchange information with one another.
We have a hard time studying this behavior because of our own limited sense of smell, and I think we are only beginning to grasp just how complex this scent-based communication can be.
I am about to tell you more than you ever wanted to know about dog pee.
Read more…



Interestingly enough, marking frequency and behavior actually is related to a dog’s social standing, at least according to one study.  The study found that dogs who had higher tail carriage (an indication of higher social status) mark more frequently than dogs of low social standing and engaging in overmarking much more frequently. The study also found that sex and intact status had no effect on the frequency of marking and counter marking however intact males were more likely to overmark intact females and that dogs only adjacent-mark on the urine of unfamiliar dogs.

Interesting you should bring up that study: it’s a prime example of what I like to call taking dominance out of context (yes, even scientists do it!) Tail base position can be used as an indicator of social status when observed within a group of animals that are familiar with one another. However, it doesn’t imply “dominance” when a dog has its tail raised up high just walking around with its owner. (Recall: dominance describes a relationship, not a character trait.)
Confidence is probably a better descriptor than “social standing” in this study’s case. It makes sense that less confident dogs are less likely to scent-mark than confident ones, just like less confident dogs are less likely to allow other dogs to smell their anogenital area.
(Also, any paper that only cites sources pre-1999 including Schenkel’s paper is not one you want to take seriously when it talks about dominance.)

Do you have access to the full text of that study you could send my way? I don’t see the Schenkel paper in the citation list nor any discussion of dominance whatsoever in the parts of the paper I can find available for free. I mean I’m assuming you aren’t using “social standing” as a synonym for “dominance” or using dominance to describe a static behavioral trait, right?

koryos:

tailovecna:

dogitmayconcern:

dogofmylife:

koryos:

Canid Scent-Marking (or, Why Dogs Pee on Things)

I took a lot of pictures of dogs peeing on things for this article.

If you own a dog, have walked a dog, or just have seen a dog on TV, you have probably seen a dog peeing. Particularly that stereotyped male raised-leg posture that Luke is demonstrating above. (In this case, stereotyped refers to a fixed and repetitive set of movements, not a form of doggie-profiling.)

Dogs have a better sense of smell than we do. Heck, most mammals do; we just happen to be in a group- the simians- that ended up using vision a lot more than scent. At some point we more or less lost a means of communication that is absolutely fundamental to the lives of our hairy, warm-blooded cousins.

I’ve talked a bit before about how basic biological behaviors- such as sex or grooming or eating- can be co-opted by evolution to have a social meaning. For canids, urination has become a huge part of how they exchange information with one another.

We have a hard time studying this behavior because of our own limited sense of smell, and I think we are only beginning to grasp just how complex this scent-based communication can be.

I am about to tell you more than you ever wanted to know about dog pee.

Read more…

Interestingly enough, marking frequency and behavior actually is related to a dog’s social standing, at least according to one study.  The study found that dogs who had higher tail carriage (an indication of higher social status) mark more frequently than dogs of low social standing and engaging in overmarking much more frequently. The study also found that sex and intact status had no effect on the frequency of marking and counter marking however intact males were more likely to overmark intact females and that dogs only adjacent-mark on the urine of unfamiliar dogs.

Interesting you should bring up that study: it’s a prime example of what I like to call taking dominance out of context (yes, even scientists do it!) Tail base position can be used as an indicator of social status when observed within a group of animals that are familiar with one another. However, it doesn’t imply “dominance” when a dog has its tail raised up high just walking around with its owner. (Recall: dominance describes a relationship, not a character trait.)

Confidence is probably a better descriptor than “social standing” in this study’s case. It makes sense that less confident dogs are less likely to scent-mark than confident ones, just like less confident dogs are less likely to allow other dogs to smell their anogenital area.

(Also, any paper that only cites sources pre-1999 including Schenkel’s paper is not one you want to take seriously when it talks about dominance.)

Do you have access to the full text of that study you could send my way? I don’t see the Schenkel paper in the citation list nor any discussion of dominance whatsoever in the parts of the paper I can find available for free. I mean I’m assuming you aren’t using “social standing” as a synonym for “dominance” or using dominance to describe a static behavioral trait, right?

dogitmayconcern:

dogofmylife:

koryos:

Canid Scent-Marking (or, Why Dogs Pee on Things)
I took a lot of pictures of dogs peeing on things for this article.
If you own a dog, have walked a dog, or just have seen a dog on TV, you have probably seen a dog peeing. Particularly that stereotyped male raised-leg posture that Luke is demonstrating above. (In this case, stereotyped refers to a fixed and repetitive set of movements, not a form of doggie-profiling.)
Dogs have a better sense of smell than we do. Heck, most mammals do; we just happen to be in a group- the simians- that ended up using vision a lot more than scent. At some point we more or less lost a means of communication that is absolutely fundamental to the lives of our hairy, warm-blooded cousins.
I’ve talked a bit before about how basic biological behaviors- such as sex or grooming or eating- can be co-opted by evolution to have a social meaning. For canids, urination has become a huge part of how they exchange information with one another.
We have a hard time studying this behavior because of our own limited sense of smell, and I think we are only beginning to grasp just how complex this scent-based communication can be.
I am about to tell you more than you ever wanted to know about dog pee.
Read more…

Thought this was very interesting. I have no knowledge on pee-mails other than that Mila does it. A lot. She will also leave pee-mail on random junk on the ground like fast food bags and random leaves.

I always get annoyed when people suggest that marking behaviors are related to dominance. That a dog is claiming ownership of something just because he pees on it. Most of the time I think the actual translation is much closer to “….And Fido was here. And over here. And he was over here , too. Oh and Fido was on this bush, and that shrubbery…” etc. They are just getting the word out.
Though Leia is notorious for counter marking (over the top) of Sully and Zulu’s pee spots. They are the two big intact males at ZSC, and she wants everyone coming and going to know they are her boys, no one else’s. Leia is spayed, but apparently did not get the memo. 

Interestingly enough, marking frequency and behavior actually is related to a dog’s social standing, at least according to one study.  The study found that dogs who had higher tail carriage (an indication of higher social status) mark more frequently than dogs of low social standing and engaging in overmarking much more frequently. The study also found that sex and intact status had no effect on the frequency of marking and counter marking however intact males were more likely to overmark intact females and that dogs only adjacent-mark on the urine of unfamiliar dogs.

dogitmayconcern:

dogofmylife:

koryos:

Canid Scent-Marking (or, Why Dogs Pee on Things)

I took a lot of pictures of dogs peeing on things for this article.

If you own a dog, have walked a dog, or just have seen a dog on TV, you have probably seen a dog peeing. Particularly that stereotyped male raised-leg posture that Luke is demonstrating above. (In this case, stereotyped refers to a fixed and repetitive set of movements, not a form of doggie-profiling.)

Dogs have a better sense of smell than we do. Heck, most mammals do; we just happen to be in a group- the simians- that ended up using vision a lot more than scent. At some point we more or less lost a means of communication that is absolutely fundamental to the lives of our hairy, warm-blooded cousins.

I’ve talked a bit before about how basic biological behaviors- such as sex or grooming or eating- can be co-opted by evolution to have a social meaning. For canids, urination has become a huge part of how they exchange information with one another.

We have a hard time studying this behavior because of our own limited sense of smell, and I think we are only beginning to grasp just how complex this scent-based communication can be.

I am about to tell you more than you ever wanted to know about dog pee.

Read more…

Thought this was very interesting. I have no knowledge on pee-mails other than that Mila does it. A lot. She will also leave pee-mail on random junk on the ground like fast food bags and random leaves.

I always get annoyed when people suggest that marking behaviors are related to dominance. That a dog is claiming ownership of something just because he pees on it. Most of the time I think the actual translation is much closer to “….And Fido was here. And over here. And he was over here , too. Oh and Fido was on this bush, and that shrubbery…” etc. They are just getting the word out.

Though Leia is notorious for counter marking (over the top) of Sully and Zulu’s pee spots. They are the two big intact males at ZSC, and she wants everyone coming and going to know they are her boys, no one else’s. Leia is spayed, but apparently did not get the memo. 

Interestingly enough, marking frequency and behavior actually is related to a dog’s social standing, at least according to one study.  The study found that dogs who had higher tail carriage (an indication of higher social status) mark more frequently than dogs of low social standing and engaging in overmarking much more frequently. The study also found that sex and intact status had no effect on the frequency of marking and counter marking however intact males were more likely to overmark intact females and that dogs only adjacent-mark on the urine of unfamiliar dogs.

Thank you for all the suggestions on what to put in my new squeeze tubes! Time to try a bunch of shit and see what Captain Pickypants likes :)