July 22, 2014

dogjournal:

NEW DOG PARK OPENS AT MISSION VALLEY MALL 

The grand opening was held on July 17th for a new dog park at the Mission Valley Mall in San Diego. The new park, located near Macy’s, is 300-square-feet in size and features synthetic grass, automatic water stations, and benches. The San Diego Humane Society and SPCA already has several events scheduled for the new dog park. Looks like a great place to play! (Photos by Kevin Andrew Falk)

This seems like a terrible idea to me to be honest.

July 22, 2014
tempurafriedhappiness:

Going through old stuff and this photo punched me in the gut. I can’t believe my sweet, happy boy is gone. Love you, Epic, and miss you every second of every day.

tempurafriedhappiness:

Going through old stuff and this photo punched me in the gut. I can’t believe my sweet, happy boy is gone. Love you, Epic, and miss you every second of every day.

(via simply-canine)

July 22, 2014

tempurafriedhappiness:

Epic and his JollyBall. That smile tho…

I love your dog.

(Source: Flickr / dynamutt)

July 22, 2014
tempurafriedhappiness:

Epic, February 2010

tempurafriedhappiness:

Epic, February 2010

July 22, 2014
mmmhoneycombs:

Ugh, love this shot of her eating.

mmmhoneycombs:

Ugh, love this shot of her eating.

(via simply-canine)

July 22, 2014

(Source: ericuhlorain, via schutzhund)

July 22, 2014
pawsitivelypowerful:

grossnara:

East European Shepherd

This is Erich v Grafenwerth, 1920 Seiger, he is a GSD. (He’s a bit older in this picture.)

From my understanding “East European Shepherds” are dogs developed from GSD/husky heritage that look like working bred GSDs that originated in the 1930s.  But Erich is one of the early purebred foundation German Shepherds born in 1918.

Oh interesting, I didn’t know Eastern European shepherds were a separate breed. I thought they meant “a GSD for Eastern Europe”

pawsitivelypowerful:

grossnara:

East European Shepherd

This is Erich v Grafenwerth, 1920 Seiger, he is a GSD. (He’s a bit older in this picture.)

From my understanding “East European Shepherds” are dogs developed from GSD/husky heritage that look like working bred GSDs that originated in the 1930s.  But Erich is one of the early purebred foundation German Shepherds born in 1918.

Oh interesting, I didn’t know Eastern European shepherds were a separate breed. I thought they meant “a GSD for Eastern Europe”

July 21, 2014
grossnara:

East European Shepherd

grossnara:

East European Shepherd

(via bernesemountaingoat)

July 21, 2014

grossnara:

WWI messenger dogs

(via cooldogofficial)

July 20, 2014

Anonymous said: What kind of brush do you use on Kaiser?

twobigears:

kaisertheshepherd:

Hi! c: We keep a little slicker brush in the dog supply basket, and just grab that to use in between trips to the groomer. It’s nothing special, just an off brand from Petco.

Slicker brushes are okay for a dog like Kaiser who gets regularly groomed at a professional and just needs a little maintenance in between. But I wouldn’t recommend it as a regular brush for a GSD. Slickers are more for breeds like poodles and bichons, and are meant to help detangle and fluff their soft coats. Not so much for de-shedding double-coated dogs though you can use them for that but it wouldn’t be my first choice on a GSD. It’s very easy to brush-burn a dog with a slicker if you use it too much or too roughly.

If you’re doing all the brushing on your GSD yourself (as I do!) you’ll get best results with more than one type of brush. I use a combination of the Zoom Groom, Furminator, and fine comb.

The Zoom Groom is my personal favorite for short-haired double-coat dogs. People are skeptical because it looks nothing like any other brush but it works great! And you can brush and brush and brush with it and it won’t burn your dog’s skin or take out anything but already-loose fur. Plus it’s a heck of a lot cheaper than the Furminator! And along the lines of different brushes for different purposes, a Zoom Groom would not be recommended for long haired dogs or single-coated dogs like poodles.

Furminators are great but super expensive almost everywhere (I got mine on Amazon for $25, not sure what they are now but in stores I seem them for $50-60+ which is ridiculous IMO). Like a slicker, they are also easy to over-use. If you’re not careful it will start cutting your dog’s top-coat instead of just pulling out undercoat. Use a light touch, basically skimming it over your dog instead of pressing hard.

I use the comb last, almost flat against the dog instead of perpendicular to their skin to avoid scratching. It helps pick up any leftover loose fur and makes my dogs nice and smooth.

Other people use undercoat rakes, personally I don’t but have nothing against them. Just be careful and don’t press too hard since some of them are rather pointy and can scratch your dog.

Sorry to butt in, it’s just very important to recognize that there are a wide variety of brushes and not every brush is for every breed, and some need to be used very carefully.

Happy brushing!

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4:00pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZlDtJs1M0xZYi
  
Filed under: GSD grooming